No one but our communities can bestow a ‘social licence to operate’ on LLWR, which is why we place as much emphasis on community relationships as contractual and regulatory relationships.

It’s not a licence that you apply for and then place in a frame and hang on a wall.

It’s intangible and it’s also non-permanent – it has to be earned and then maintained, which is why we strive so diligently to retain strong bonds with our community.

When we embarked on a planning application that, if granted, would secure our site’s future until 2050, keeping the public informed was a top priority.

Extensive community engagement over the development included a public consultation exhibition at Drigg Village Hall, which utilised display boards to help local residents understand more about it.

A powerful 3D computer model, highlighting changes in the site’s visual appearance as the development would progress, also proved popular with the public.

This engagement was typical of LLWR’s mission to explain and inform.

Corporate Social Responsibility

We endeavour to apply a sustainable ethos to all that we do and strive to be an ethically-responsible organisation with a positive impact for our communities.

We will deliver this impact through:

Our People

DSC_0987

LLWR will ensure employee engagement to further build on employee morale and enhance their ability to take on roles in the community beyond the gate.

In 2014/15 West Cumbria Hospice at Home was adopted as LLWR’s charity of the year, and £4,420 was raised through a string of activities, in which employees gave their time and money to assist.

We adopted Great North Air Ambulance as our charity for 2015/16 and raised a record £6,116.73.

Some 22 volunteers under the LLWR banner raised over £4,700 in sponsorship by taking part in Cumbria Community Foundation’s Rivers Ride cycling event in September, 2015. Funding from this annual event assists worthy causes throughout the county.

Thirty volunteers offered to step forward to help stricken colleagues and the wider community during the West Cumbrian floods in December 2015, while others assisted the rescue as members of Mountain Rescue and HM Coastguard teams.

LLWR’s terms and conditions of employment allow additional times for employees to fulfil valuable community roles such as JPs, school governors and reserve fire fighters.

Several All Hands briefing sessions are held throughout the year, facilitated by the Managing Director, to highlight key issues or messages. These sessions are open to the entire LLWR workforce.

Smaller, round table discussions are hosted by the MD, in which groups of up to 15 members of the workforce are encouraged to highlight issues or concerns in an informal setting.

The intranet home page is updated a minimum of once a week and an employee-led internal newsletter, Level Best, published monthly, keeps the organisation informed on areas of interest.

The company’s website is also regularly refreshed with new content.

The entire organisation has a chance to attend an annual employee communication forum, at Energus, Lillyhall, which ensures all messages are aligned to NDA strategic objectives.

Our Supply Chain

MHTsediment transport 009

Where possible we look to procure locally to support the Cumbrian economy and minimise the distances which materials for all areas of our operation must be transported to reach our site.

During construction of Vault 9 we sourced quarry products within Cumbria and contracts were agreed with quarries at Millom and Frizington, supporting sustainable local employment and infrastructure.

On a day-to-day basis, food and drink for our employees and contractors is provided by businesses local to the site. Furthermore, by providing segregated waste and recycling services, LLWR is becoming a key link in the sustainable procurement chain for our consignors throughout the UK nuclear industry.

In 2014/15 LLWR exceeded both NDA and Government targets for spending with Small to Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs). The organisation spent 30.5% of its total spend with SMEs, equating to £16.47m.

The Government’s target minimum spend with SMEs – businesses with fewer than 250 employees and turnover of less than €50m – is 25%.

We increased supply chain spend in West Cumbria from 40% in 2013/14 to 49% the following year, with local businesses such as Romar, Burridge Transport and NuExec  among the many with whom we work.

Our Stakeholders

LLWR helped fund Drigg Hog Roast
LLWR helped fund Drigg Hog Roast

Fostering good links with our stakeholders in the West Cumbria community which hosts our operations is core to LLWR’s philosophy.

Dialogue with our stakeholders is key to building and maintaining these relationships and we, alongside our site owner, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, participate fully at senior management level in the West Cumbria Sites Stakeholder Group and a number of its sub-committees, including the LLWR Working Group.

Monthly liaison meetings are held with representatives from Drigg and Carleton Parish Council. In October 2014 we hosted a Community Open Day, giving residents of local parishes an opportunity to tour our site and Pelham House, and meet senior management and staff. Demand was high and a further Open Day followed in April 2015. More than 300 stakeholders attended a Customer Forum in Penrith.

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LLWR gifts two former shipping containers to Seascale Scouts

Our quarterly external newsletter, On The Level, keeps key stakeholders updated on important issues.

Following construction of Vault 9 and receipt of the first waste shipment, £1.5m each year has been donated to the Copeland Community Fund, £50,000 of which is ring-fenced for initiatives and projects within the Parish of Drigg and Carleton – the closest community to the LLWR site.

Although a small site, we aim to make the biggest socio-economic impact we can on our communities and £35,000 is also set aside annually for investment in community initiatives within a 15-mile radius (ie from Whitehaven to the north and Millom to the south).

We believe strongly in developing opportunities and recognising achievements in West Cumbria. To this end, LLWR financially supports youth organisations, sports clubs, community awards and grassroots funds. In 2014 we were the largest contributor in financial terms to Whitehaven Rugby League Club’s extensive community programme, helping introduce many young people to the sport.

Whitehaven Rugby League
Youngsters flocked to Whitehaven Rugby League’s Summer Community Camp, funded by LLWR.

It is widely recognised that development projects bring about socioeconomic benefits such as employment and procurement. However, as a responsible organisation we also anticipate other impacts such as increased noise and traffic.

Our strategy for addressing this is to ensure that, where possible, deliveries to the site, whether low level waste or construction materials for projects, arrive by rail. Our aim is to minimise the impact of all our operations and projects on the local environment.

If LLWR’s current planning application is granted, a Construction Management Plan would focus on site access and traffic.

The importation of construction materials by rail would be maximised, working hours and methods controlled, dust would be suppressed and the perimeter of the development area screened. Local traffic would be minimised by use of a shuttle bus to ferry workers to and from site.

Our Environment

Delivery to our new company  allotment at Pelham House
Delivery to our new company allotment at Pelham House

Even though LLWR is below the NDA estate carbon emissions reporting thresholds, we continue to monitor and record how much CO2 we emit and share best practice across other Site License Companies as to how we can improve.

The LLWR site is also a haven for wildlife including numerous protected species of plants and animals, we recognise the importance of preserving these and have undertaken work to enhance habitats for these species on site.

Community Investment Policy

LLWR has ring fenced £35K to support local community schemes and initiatives with the potential for a further £30K from our PBO.

This paper provides a framework for community benefit investment and a transparent process to assist in the selection of which schemes to support and which to decline. The content that follows describes the funding selection criteria and weighting and scoring matrix.

Any activities supported by LLWR must align with the NDA’s Socio Economic Policy and if relevant, complement the work of the Copeland Community Fund which receives £1.5M per annum during the operational lifetime of Vault 9.

Applications will be restricted to a 15 mile radius of the LLWR site which covers Whitehaven to the North and Millom to the South, unless there are exceptional circumstances to warrant consideration. This decision will be at the discretion of the committee.

The committee will comprise:

  • Managing Director
  • Head of Public Affairs
  • Head of Site

The 15 mile radius will be split into 3 five mile zones with higher weighting being applied to the zone closest to the LLWR site e.g.

5 miles             = 5

10 miles           = 3

15 miles           = 1

 When considering proposals the committee will seek to answer the following questions:

  • Is the proposal acceptable under the guidelines contained in the NDA Socio-Economic Policy?
  • Does the proposal address a specific issue of deprivation, local community priority or economic opportunity?
  • Does the proposal benefit the wider community?
  • Does the proposal improve or enhance the environment?
  • Have efforts been made to maximise the impact of any potential LLWR funding (match funding)?
  • Is the proposal sustainable post LLWR funding?
  • Are good governance arrangements in place?
  • Are expected outcomes clear?
  • Will the proposal raise or enhance the LLWR reputation?
  • Does the proposal cover the designated 15 mile radius to the LLWR site?

It is proposed that LLWR adopt a local scheme and charity. The charity will be chosen by the LLWR workforce and individual fundraising efforts will be co-ordinated throughout the year with the company making a ‘top up’ or ‘match funding’ gesture at the end of the term (1 year)

The scheme will be selected from various Parish Plans and could be supported for a minimum of 1 year to a maximum of 3 years. The proviso would be that benefit would have to be derived locally within Copeland/West Cumbria and the “adopt a scheme” concept would be rotated around the Borough to ensure even-handedness and promote good relations.

The table below is a sample of proposals LLWR have supported in the past and illustrates how the scoring matrix will work.

Scoring Matrix

Proposal

Proximity   to LLWR

Site

 

 

(1 – 5)

Align with NDA Policy

 

(1 – 5)

Attracts

Match Funding

 

 

(1 – 3)

Area of Deprivation/

High Need

(1 – 5)

Benefit to wider community

 

(1 – 5)

Raise profile

of LLWR

 

(1 – 5)

Improve

the Environment

 

 

(1 – 3)

Total

(max 31 points)

Drigg Bursary

5

5

5

1

2

3

1

22

Young Fire-fighters

5

5

5

3

3

5

1

27

Shackles Off

5

5

1

3

3

3

1

21

Drigg Gala Day

5

1

5

1

5

5

1

23

Copeland Pride Awards

1

3

5

3

5

5

1

23

Rugby Stand

1

1

5

5

5

5

1

23

Millom Xmas Lights

1

1

2

5

5

3

2

19

Ennerdale Footpaths

1

1

1

1

3

2

4

13

For further information on LLWR’s CSR and Stakeholder Relations activities contact Cath Giel, Head of Public Affairs, on 019467 70233 or cath.a.giel@llwrsite.com